To dry Amber or any White Plums

Aus: Mrs. Eales Compleat Confectioner (1718-1742), S. 026

Originalrezept:

Slit your Plums in the Seam; then make a thin Syrup. If you have any Apricock-Syrup left, after your Apricocks are dry’d, put a Pint of Syrup to two Quarts of Water; if you have none, clarify single-refin’d Loaf-Sugar, and make a thin Syrup: Make the Syrup scalding hot, and put in the Plums; there must be so much Syrup as will more than cover the Plums; they must be kept under the Syrup, or they will turn red: Keep them in a Scald ’till they are tender, but not too soft; then have ready a thick Syrup of the same Sugar, clarify’d and cold, as much as will cover the Plums; let them boil, but not too fast, ’till they are very tender and clear, setting them sometimes off the Fire; then lay a Paper close to them, and set them by ’till the next Day; then boil them again ’till the Syrup is very thick; let them lye in the Syrup four or five Days, then lay them on Sieves to dry: You may put some in Codling-Jelly, first boiling the Jelly with the Weight in Sugar, and put in the Plums hot to the Jelly. Put them in Pots or Glasses.

Übersetzung:

Getrocknete Zwetschken (Pflaumen)

Transkription:

Marlene Ernst

Zitierempfehlung:
Marlene Ernst (Transkription): "To dry Amber or any White Plums", in: Mrs. Eales Compleat Confectioner (1718-1742), S. 026,
online unter: https://gastrosophie.sbg.ac.at/kbforschung/r-datenbank/?rdb_rezepte=to-dry-amber-or-any-white-plums (26.01.2022).

Datenbankeintrag erstellt von Marlene Ernst.